Lotus Elan

Soldering a Weber cover . . .

PostPost by: Sea Ranch » Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:06 pm

Greetings,

Thinking of repairing my Weber DCOE top cover. The float hinge mount (the side that is split and grips the hinge pin) has half of it broken off. Apparently a fairly common fault, as newer models are not split like this.

I'm going to attempt to put the piece back on by solder. What do you think the chances of success are??

Thanks,

Randy
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PostPost by: Chancer » Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:24 pm

There is a sort of low temp brazing/soldering process called Lumiweld which works quite well, I think that the part you are speaking of is too fine though.
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PostPost by: robertverhey » Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:35 pm

JB Weld seems to keep getting mentioned on other forums for this sort of thing. Readily available on eBay.

I once effected a reasonable temporary repair with some fine wire wrapped around the post several times, to hold the broken piece in place. Depends where it's broken. Maybe JB Weld plus some wire will do the trick, until a cheap top cover comes along
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PostPost by: AHM » Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:44 pm

Sea Ranch wrote:I'm going to attempt to put the piece back on by solder. What do you think the chances of success are??


Almost none, less still of it working!

Aluminium soldering is really easy - All you need is a lifetime's practice!

You might have sucess by creating a blob of solder (or weld) and filing it to shape.
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PostPost by: alexblack13 » Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:00 pm

I will second the above. Don't think it will work.

Having said that please have a go and hopefully you might prove us wrong. I have never seen aluminium soldered successfully.

Why not buy a new part? Might be better in the long run. Esp' for peace of mind.

Best of luck with it though.

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PostPost by: Bud English » Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:55 pm

I've found that "aluminum solders" such as Alumaloy seem to work on well cleaned sheet, extruded shapes, and sand cast parts, whether old or new. My experience has been that they aren't as good for making sound repairs to investment type cast parts due to the release agents that are added to the alloy. The joint may look good at first but most of mine failed eventually.

Getting a small enough flame isn't a problem with a micro torch using MAP gas or propane. Repair of small parts are problematic due to the size of the rod that is sold.

That's been my experience. I don't know if that helps with your decision to attempt a repair or not.
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PostPost by: Sea Ranch » Fri Feb 15, 2013 2:34 am

Thanks for the thoughts and experiences, gentlemen.

JB Weld has already been tried. It basically melted and fell off the aluminum, though stayed intact enough that I was confident I didn't have it passing through/jamming in the carb's passages. I was told later that it was probably the ethanol in the gas/petrol, more than the petroleum itself, that was the cause of this.

I have considered small gauge wire and very fine drill bit to re-secure the broken piece and the hinge pin in place. Perhaps if solder won't stick well to cast aluminum, it would at least provide support for wire.

Agreed, though, that the best long-term remedy is a replacement top, but I want it to be of the same series (of course) and vintage (so that it looks the part), too.

Where does a guy look for such a Weber part?

Thanks,

Randy

ps. Sorry I didn't include a pic originally . . . was away from my home computer initially. So below, for your viewing pleasure, is the broken casting, and then the old JB Weld job, which failed.

Image

Image
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PostPost by: robertverhey » Fri Feb 15, 2013 4:17 am

Well fastroadcars do a cover that they say will fit both early and late dcoes

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/WEBER-40-DCO ... 415wt_1038

But if you want original / used, you'll have to keep an eye on the usual on-line haunts and auto jumbles. Or you could ask the various carburettor repair places if they have any in their parts bins out the back.....but I wouldn't expect them to relinquish them for a song.....
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PostPost by: rcraven » Fri Feb 15, 2013 11:27 am

Sea Ranch wrote:I have considered small gauge wire and very fine drill bit to re-secure the broken piece and the hinge pin in place. Perhaps if solder won't stick well to cast aluminum, it would at least provide support for wire.

Randy



If you have watchmaking or modelmaking skills perhaps rather than using wire you could tap a threaded hole and secure the broken bit with a suitable screw. The hole would weaken the structure but it doesn't look as though there's much stress on it.
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PostPost by: alexblack13 » Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:19 pm

rcraven wrote:
Sea Ranch wrote:I have considered small gauge wire and very fine drill bit to re-secure the broken piece and the hinge pin in place. Perhaps if solder won't stick well to cast aluminum, it would at least provide support for wire.

Randy



If you have watchmaking or modelmaking skills perhaps rather than using wire you could tap a threaded hole and secure the broken bit with a suitable screw. The hole would weaken the structure but it doesn't look as though there's much stress on it.



Hi Guys. You are right. There is not a lot of load on the post. You could get by by using some stainless locking wire to just pill the pivot pin into position and hold it there. Then just tuck the twisted tail away neatly. Better than the weldy stuff. Keep us posted.

Al' ....
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PostPost by: el-saturn » Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:32 pm

i also had the same problem: mine got a mechanical/bonded (aircraft epoxy) cure which took a couple
of hours of fiddling: file, drill, steel rod 1,5mm a sander and elbow grease - do you want a picture? alpine greetings from the snow sandy (36/4982 - a dhc!)
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PostPost by: Sea Ranch » Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:27 pm

This thread is yet another example of this wonderful on-line community :D

Thanks for more ideas, folks. I've checked out the Fast Road Cars site. And watchmaking for small drills/taps/screws . . . what a great suggestion.

Sandy, are you saying that the aircraft epoxy resists fuel and all the other chemicals in it? Would be great. Yes, I'd love to see a pic or two if you have them handy.

Randy (no rhyme intended) :mrgreen:
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PostPost by: Esprit2 » Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:35 pm

The existing cover is toast... give it a Viking funeral and move on.

EuroCarb Ltd, in the UK
http://www.dellorto.co.uk/

DCOE parts on EuroCarb's website
http://www.dellorto.co.uk/merchandise/p ... ctionID=57
...Or...
http://tinyurl.com/89khko4
For replacement top covers, scroll down to item number 75.
?57.50 New
?39.95 Re-conditioned

Contact Matthew Cooper at EuroCarb. He not only knows Webers and Dellortos well, he also knows the Lotus applications well. If you don't see what you need on the website, ask Matt.
[email protected]

Eurocarb Ltd
Unit 2 Horseshoe Park, Pangbourne, Reading, RG8 7JW, United Kingdom
+44 (0) 118 984 2811 Phone
+44 (0) 118 9841709 FAX

No connection with EuroCarb, just a satisfied customer.

Regards,
Tim Engel
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PostPost by: Sea Ranch » Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:12 pm

Thanks for weighing in, Tim. I appreciate all your contributions on the yahoo mail list.

I believe you're right. When I gather up my funds for the extensive mechanical rebuild, it will be on my list (a used one of similar vintage).

But that won't stop me from messing around with the one I have, 'cause it's in my blood :wink:

Looks like a great shop of parts Matthew Cooper has. Can I assume, Tim, that since you are in the States you must know of no comparable source of Weber parts this side of the Atlantic? Haven't ordered from GB in a long time.
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PostPost by: Sea Ranch » Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:26 pm

I had to check out "Viking Funeral" in popular parlance, because I like the image. Among other definitions, this one stood out (I'm clearly uninitiated) . . .

Viking Funeral: The act of lighting a clump of toilet paper on fire atop ones excrement in a standard toilet bowl and then flushing the toilet causing a beautiful flaming typhoon. The fire and Log are eventually swallowed by the toilet leaving a last puff of smoke with a strong ancient burning odor.

This act is most often deployed when an individual feels the need to mask the smell of their excrement when the standard pack of matches is not available but a lighter is at hand. The burning toilet paper shows a 76% masking of the odor in most cases vs. 89% for a book of matches. Wooden matches provide an impressive 96% masking.

The second most popular reason for deploying this act is for the sheer proudness an individual may feel about the cr*p they created. As if it deserved to be sent off in style.


I was thinking that one should be careful to raise plastic toilet seats before attempting this one . . . :wink:
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