Lotus Elan

Engine mounts for the twin cam

PostPost by: mbell » Wed Sep 20, 2017 6:49 pm

I meant to post this is the other thread but I'd guess the problem with mount failure is the heat of the outer U increasing to the point the bond fails. So I'd think just covering the outer U in heat reflective stick on sheet could address the issue with out the weight/hassle of a metal heat shield.
'73 +2 130/5 RHD, now on the road and very slowly rolling though a "restoration"
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PostPost by: prezoom » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:23 pm

Giving the reflective gold heat shield a long term test. Some qualifiers though. The mounts on my Zetec are similar to the Spyder, with the mount bolted to the chassis. The exhaust is a 4-2-1 that is entirely in front of the mount, but quite close. I did make a small shield that bolts to the two bolts where the engine bracket attaches to the mount. The shield provides an air gap to the mount and is covered with the reflective gold sheet. This was done last Thursday and, so far, so good. The mounts are new and purchased from RDent.
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PostPost by: Grizzly » Thu Sep 21, 2017 9:57 am

May be worth your while making a heat shield for the Clutch slave while your at it, if you are having engine mount issues it's a matter of time before the Clutch starts playing up through heat too.
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PostPost by: prezoom » Thu Sep 21, 2017 3:38 pm

Chris, if the slave shield was addressed to me, that over heating problem was removed when I installed the Mondeo/Contour clutch release mechanism in the bell housing. Removal of the external cylinder and the cast securing ring, resulted in a lot more room for the larger diameter exhaust. Moving the slave bleed up to between the two master cylinders, makes for self bleeding. Open the bleed, add fluid to the clutch master and the fluid seeks its own level. Turns clutch bleeding time into adult beverage time, and a large smile on my face.
Rob Walker
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1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

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PostPost by: Grizzly » Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:30 am

Rob, i suspect you have done the more comprehensive fix for the issue but it's allot of work when a simple heat shield would provide an adequate fix until next time the engine has to be taken out for what ever reason....
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PostPost by: prezoom » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:41 pm

Not really, the Contour throwout is far superior to the standard slave cylinder, in that it is out of the weather, and away from a high heat source, something factories have been doing for several years. There now is no pumping of the pedal, no pieces of wood to hold the pedal down to move the trapped air, no crawling under the car to make adjustments, a one person operation, which only takes the time to pour the fluid into the master cylinder. In that sense, I solved a number of problems that exist on my S2. A new cylinder, a couple of hours on the lathe with a lump of aluminum, some AN fittings, two new -3 AN lines, were all that was needed. A little more time could counted as added, in that I sleeved the removed cylinder, which was in poor shape, for a replacement on the S2 if needed.
Rob Walker
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50-0315N
1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

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PostPost by: Grizzly » Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:07 pm

Rob, i get all that but your missing the point, i wasn't telling you to fit a heat shield to your clutch but JimE as it sounds like his car is bone stock and going that route with the Engine mount already. It was more a 'While your knocking up a shield for the Engine mount it's worth knocking one up for the Clutch too' i agree that IF Jim had complained about a overheating clutch your method would be the best way to fix it but for a few extra minutes of messing about Jim could dramatically reduce the heat on the stock Slave without the need to remove the engine from the car saving awkward moments sat it traffic when the clutch starts to play silly buggers.
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PostPost by: JimE » Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:11 pm

Chris - it's certainly the easiest solution for both. Jim
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PostPost by: prezoom » Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:52 pm

Agreed. A shield is a good solution towards a final fix. My slave on the S2 is shielded partially. It also has a flexible fluid line from the master, insulated (LHD), which means I do not have to disconnect the cylinder from the fluid line when removing the engine and transmission. Pull off the spring and C clip and slide the cylinder out of the ring. I made a plug the slips into the end of the cylinder that has a flange with a hole in it. A longish bolt through the flange and the spring hole prevents the piston from escaping the cylinder. The cylinder can then be left hanging during engine/transmission removal and replacement. When ready, remove the bracket, slip it through the ring, install the push rod, then the spring and often as not, you will not even have to re-adjust the clearance, and there is no need to bleed the cylinder, unless you want to change the fluid. In that case, when the cylinder is removed, you can position it with the bleed screw at the high point, which will prevent any trapped air. With an open bleed, and the cylinder below the master, gravity will take care of moving the fluid from the master to the cylinder. Just do not let the master run dry of fluid.
Rob Walker
26-4889
50-0315N
1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

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