Lotus Elan

Stromburg fuel T

PostPost by: Sheldo » Sat Dec 21, 2019 6:27 pm

My federal plus with stromburgs is leaking a little at the T inlet where there is a 1/8 pipe that is pushed in to the carbs. I've tried to push them in a little tighter to get them to seal, but don't want over do things. Suggestions - is there a better way?
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PostPost by: tedtaylor » Sat Dec 21, 2019 7:03 pm

i'm pretty sure the brass "T" (hopefully you replaced the plastic one) is connected with rubber fuel hose. Little 2 inch sections to left and right. all secured with hose clamps (jubilee?) and tightened up good. The short metal piping stubs out of the strombergs are not removeable as far as I know/remember.
is your leak elsewhere or am I talking about the same spot?
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PostPost by: 69S4 » Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:19 pm

Brass T pieces work ok but most of the ones I?ve found are too wide to fit between the metal stubs and keep the air box bolt holes aligned. You need to cut a bit off of each of the T piece side arms before sliding the joining fuel hose over each side. I?m also not a great fan of Jubilee clips at that diameter as they tend to distort from a circular shape. Flat band screw clamps are much better and cheap.
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PostPost by: Sheldo » Sun Dec 22, 2019 1:01 am

It's the metal stub that came loose from one side. The T has been replaced with a brass T. What's the options on the stub coming out of the carb??
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PostPost by: elangtv2000 » Mon Dec 30, 2019 6:25 pm

You could re-insert the pipe and use bearing retainer Loctite. Once you have the hoses in place and the Loctite has cured you should be fine.
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PostPost by: Sheldo » Mon Dec 30, 2019 9:09 pm

I had thought about something along that line but hadn't had a chance to look to see what would be resistant to the fuel.
I will give the Loctite a shot.
Thanks!
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PostPost by: Sheldo » Sun Jan 05, 2020 1:56 am

Thanks elangtv2000 for the advice on the bearing retainer. That did the trick!!! Much appriciated.

One problem solved, which leads to another issue - I have replaced the mechanical fuel pump with an electric, and mounted it in the engine bay opposite of where the mechanical fuel pump was. I connected the electrical to a spade on the coil that was activated with the switch turned on. Seemed to work fine until I got on the road and the tach went nuts. So I am guessing that there was some interference and I need to find a different power source for the fuel pump?? Suggestions on where to draw the electrical for the fuel pump???
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PostPost by: mbell » Sun Jan 05, 2020 2:10 am

I added a fused relay by the solenoid on the bulkhead, I use the main 12v battery connection for power and coil power to switch it.

Your tacho goes crazy as the power to the coil runs through it and the tacho "counts" the current pulses through it. An electric pump also causes additional current pulses causing your tacho reading to go crazy.

The relay is a constant draw with one pulse at turn on. So shouldn't effect your tacho operation.
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PostPost by: StressCraxx » Sun Jan 05, 2020 4:01 am

Sheldo wrote:Thanks elangtv2000 for the advice on the bearing retainer. That did the trick!!! Much appriciated.

One problem solved, which leads to another issue - I have replaced the mechanical fuel pump with an electric, and mounted it in the engine bay opposite of where the mechanical fuel pump was. I connected the electrical to a spade on the coil that was activated with the switch turned on. Seemed to work fine until I got on the road and the tach went nuts. So I am guessing that there was some interference and I need to find a different power source for the fuel pump?? Suggestions on where to draw the electrical for the fuel pump???


One more thought, most electric fuel pumps do not pull suction very well, they don't like to "lift" the fuel. Most instructions for electric fuel pumps specify installing the pump at or near the tank outlet so the suction lift is as short as possible. This also reduces the chances of vapor lock on hot days. YMMV

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PostPost by: elangtv2000 » Sun Jan 05, 2020 3:53 pm

Glad it worked for you, Sheldo.

I second MBell's and Dan's comments. I mount the fuel pump in the trunk close to the fuel tank so it can push the fuel, and connect it to both a relay and an inertia safety switch, mounted behind the dashboard (you may find an easier location). The inertia switch is an important safety feature to keep fuel from pumping in the event of an accident.

Also, you only need a few pounds of fuel pressure, so if you aren't already using a low-pressure pump, a regulator will keep your needle valves from bouncing, and potentially overfilling the float bowls.
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PostPost by: h20hamelan » Sun Jan 05, 2020 5:08 pm

Inertia switch, depending on the direction/orientation.
Most vehicles are mounted in an upright position, I mount mine angled a bit forward. My thought is that most of the impacts I would be in, could be head on. Rather than the car dropping a few feet. If one is using 4000lb passenger summer 13? tyres out in the rain... if one goes backwards off the road in which case you would want the inertia backwards. Has anyone ever installed multiple switches in various directions...wow
In the accidents I attend, and vehicles in the rhubarb. The inertia switch is almost never triggered in a head-on (though out here its usually a tree rather than a vehicle). It?s only when a car drops off the shoulder into said sweet rhubarb that the inertia is triggered.

Different condsiderations for city, rural, and wilderness travel I suppose.
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