Lotus Elan

Fuse box location Plus 2

PostPost by: draenog » Wed Jul 27, 2016 3:34 pm

draenog wrote:
gearbox wrote:They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so does anyone have a late 60's early 70's Plus 2 running a generator showing the exact locations of these components? It would make it a lot easier. I will also need to know where all the nearby relays would be mounted, so should you come across any pics of those, please post as well. Thanks Allan


This topic came up a couple of months ago and I posted a picture of the fuse boxes on my RHD 1970 +2S - it also shows the regulator (on the firewall).

http://www.lotuselan.net/forums/lotus-electrical-f38/fuse-box-location-t36818.html#p252684

Hope it helps...


Looks like the second time my post gets ignored. Could take more photos but I can't be bothered.
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PostPost by: gearbox » Wed Jul 27, 2016 4:27 pm


Looks like the second time my post gets ignored. Could take more photos but I can't be bothered.


Stop being so sensitive, no one is ignoring you lol. I did see the pics and from that I figured out where the regulator goes. So thank you for that. But still trying to figure out the location for the fuse box which your pictures showed a later car with a different system. Given the PO decided to pull every wire and component, I need all the help I can get and the factory manual doesn't show location for the most part. I'm hoping that once I get all the components in the right spots, the wiring harness, or what is left, will show me what goes where. Thanks Allan
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PostPost by: Orsom Weels » Thu Jul 28, 2016 9:16 am

The comments I made regarding Lucas were aimed more at the wiring rather than other components. I wasn't for a minute suggesting it was better than contemporary manufacturers products, but I still argue that with many vehicles 40+ years old & still running with their original Lucas wiring, Rohan's & my own +2's being examples, it is no worse. Any wiring insulation exposed to extreme heat or oil/fuel contaminates will degrade in one way or another after a prolonged period, & many of the other problems associated with wiring in general are the result of amateur DIYers adding things like stereo's, extra gauges or spot lights etc, with no real idea of how to go about it correctly & generally bodging things along the way. Wire gauge would have been specified by the vehicle manufacturer, & as a general rule, most cars were built down to a budget & thinner wire meant less copper & hence less cost. Just look at the wire gauge in modern cars, all done to cut costs. The design/layout of the loom also would have been down to the vehicle manufacturer, so again, not really the fault of Lucas. Add in to this the fact that the vehicles concerned became just worthless old cars before they gained some classic status & therefore tended to fall in to the hands of those on limited budgets, general maintenance just didn't happen & essential repairs were done as cheaply as possible, often using already past their sell by date second hand parts, it's not surprising they gained a reputation for unreliability.
Moving on to Lucas components, yes, some had their weak points, & perhaps Bosch equivalents of the period may have been better, but there were a lot that were worse, Delco & Marelli for a start. Anyone who has had a Delco distributor would be lucky to get two of the cams giving the same points gap from new, leave alone after it had done a few miles! I vividly remember spending hours stoning the cams to get the same points gap, & open the points at the same degrees before TDC for each cylinder when tuning Vauxhall Chevettes. (Not for me I hasten to add :) ) I don't recall Lucas dynamos, regulators & alternators being significantly less reliable than their contemporaries, indeed the original alternator from my +2 is now on my Corsair as I decided to upgrade from the dynamo it had as standard. I fitted a new alternator to the +2 when I restored it in about 1990 as a matter of course, keeping the original as spare as there was nothing wrong with it. After the best part of 20 years sitting under the bench, I dug it out, gave it a clean, stuck it on the Corsair & it's working perfectly. I don't know what more you could ask? Likewise, starter motors, given the conditions they are asked to perform in, give many years of trouble free service. Like dynamos & alternators, they may require a set of brushes & the odd bearing once in a while, but at least they are made so you can carry out such repairs easily.
gus, I'm not sure who you are referring to with your statement ?One must mention they continued to use a generator until 1980, a good 15 years after everyone had changed to alternators.?, but I don't remember any British manufacturers using dynamo's, or generators if you prefer, after about the mid seventies, certainly they had gone by 1980, most phasing them out in the late sixties/early seventies & moving to alternators to cope with the increased electrical demand that was becoming the norm.
Regarding the 'cutting out every time you drove through a puddle' problem, well yes, we've probably all been there at some point, but it is certainly not restricted to Lucas equipped cars, & comes more down to component location, which is down to the vehicle manufacturer, not the manufacturer of the component, Lucas or otherwise, & often attempts by vehicle manufacturers to minimise this problem are removed by owners who then complain when the car stops in the wet. I have a Morris 1100 which still has the original rubber distributor cap cover that BMC felt it needed, & so equipped it will keep going through the heaviest rain & deepest puddles. I know from experience the removal of this cover will make servicing much easier, but it will also cause the car to stop in heavy rain.
As gearbox rightly points out, Lucas could have made things better, but then they would have been more expensive & vehicle manufacturers would have looked elsewhere for a cheaper alternative, & we would now be moaning about them instead.
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PostPost by: gus » Thu Jul 28, 2016 11:01 am

spitfires had generators till the end of run, as did IIRC midgets. I do not believe any american manufacturer used them past maybe 1965, and that is a stretch.

Lucas was crap, there is no use defending it. Some were better[my +2 has all original switchgear] most was worse.

the reason any of it still works is we treat these things like museum pieces
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PostPost by: draenog » Thu Jul 28, 2016 1:59 pm

gus wrote:spitfires had generators till the end of run, as did IIRC midgets. I do not believe any american manufacturer used them past maybe 1965, and that is a stretch.


My 1973 VW campervan has a dynamo, while my 1968 MGB has an alternator so we were way ahead of the Germans there.
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PostPost by: Orsom Weels » Thu Jul 28, 2016 2:38 pm

gus wrote:spitfires had generators till the end of run, as did IIRC midgets. I do not believe any american manufacturer used them past maybe 1965, and that is a stretch.

Lucas was crap, there is no use defending it. Some were better[my +2 has all original switchgear] most was worse.

the reason any of it still works is we treat these things like museum pieces


I can't say for the US market, but I can say, with some degree of certainty, that for the UK market, Spitfires were fitted with an alternator as standard from the introduction of the MK4 model in 1970 & rubber bumper Triumph engined Midgets were fitted with alternators as standard, I think from it's introduction in 1974.

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on whether Lucas is/was crap or not, but undeniably there's still a lot of it about & still working as it's manufacturer intended.

You may treat your cars like museum pieces, but I certainly do not, they get used on every possible occasion, including commuting to work, shopping trips, holidays & general running the family about, as well as classic car runs & shows etc. I know a lot of others use theirs in the same way, you only have to read through some of the posts on this forum to get a idea of the mileage & sort of journeys these & cars like them achieve. If they were that unreliable, none of us would get anywhere :D
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