Lotus Elan

Car Alarms

PostPost by: markcs » Tue Mar 27, 2012 9:32 pm

I have stripped my Plus 2 down to its component parts and have ordered a new chassis ready for a complete nut and bolt rebuild.

I will be designing and building my own wiring loom for the car and want to ensure I incorporate all the wires needed into the loom, so am planning early.

I am considering installing a car alarm/immobiliser. Does anyone have any experience in a modern alarm system in their Elans, or is it just too much trouble and too many false alarms? Perhaps a simple hidden switch in the low current starter switch circuit to the solenoid would do the job as well and be cheaper.

Grateful as always for views/comments.

Mark
markcs
First Gear
First Gear
 
Posts: 31
Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Location: Dorset, England

PostPost by: stugilmour » Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:40 am

Mark, you could consider the 'immobilizer' that was a stock feature in some of the Plus 2's. You may have missed it during tear down. It is a small slide switch located in the glove box. In 'immobilizer' setting it cuts the coil low voltage feed and causes the air horns to sound if you attempt to start the car. Note these have been known to fail and are often stripped out though.

A popular way to go is a battery cut off switch (or relay). Works well for storing the car and service work as well. Manual switches are common. I got a purpose built relay type that has a key chain remote control, so I don't have to dig into the lower boot to disconnect all electrical and didn't have to wire up a switch with high amp cable. My modern radio does not loose any memory settings when disconnected, so I find this set-up really good.

On a lighter note, I might get it running before worrying too much how to keep it from starting. :)

Good luck with the project, It's a lot of fun!
Stu
1969 Plus 2 Federal LHD
User avatar
stugilmour
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1751
Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada

PostPost by: markcs » Wed Mar 28, 2012 9:25 am

Stu,

Many thanks for your reply. Have just checked the glove box and no switch seen or cutout where it might have been located, no indication on the electrical diagram for my Plus 2 model in the workshop manual either; however I know that this does not necessarily mean it wasn't there! The wiring loom in my car and the workshop manual diagram only seem to match in some sort of parallel universe!! I ran the car for 15 years or so before the strip down and the only faults I had with her were earth related. I will not be using the chassis for common returns on the rebuild and instead will use a common ground bus type system that I also used when building my Vans RV7 plane.

I love your idea for wireless remotely controlled relay/contactor at the battery: also provides complete battery isolation. Many standard products on the market including blue tooth controlled relays that operate from a mobile phone, that could simply operate a main battery contactor in the boot.

Many thanks for the inspiration.

Mark
markcs
First Gear
First Gear
 
Posts: 31
Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Location: Dorset, England

PostPost by: nebogipfel » Wed Mar 28, 2012 11:40 am

I use a concealed battery cut-off (low tech' variety). You could also incorporate a concealed LT cut-off switch which would be "belt and braces"

IMO the original Lotus cut-off switch is more trouble than it's worth and next to useless because everyone seems to know about them :wink:
John

No longer active on here, I value my privacy.
User avatar
nebogipfel
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1588
Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Location: Norfolk UK

PostPost by: Henry VIIII » Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:11 pm

I used to have a high current switch thing in the boot with a small fuse across it. The fuse kept the radio settings live.

But I was forever forgetting about it an any attempt to start the car blew the fuse, of course, so I removed the big switch. :x

On thinking about it today, I've come up with a brilliant wheeze; instead of a fuse, connect an alarm horn across the switch. The dribble current for the radio will be too low to sound the horn, but any attempt to start the car will sound that horn if the heavy switch is open. :P
Henry
1967 S3 FHC
A joke a day helps you work, rest, and play. :lol:
Henry VIIII
Second Gear
Second Gear
 
Posts: 157
Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Location: Middlesex, UK

PostPost by: Jason1 » Tue Jul 03, 2012 7:41 am

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/270800568782? ... 7990wt_905

A tracker maybe of more use and pretty cheap (see link above)? Our cars are very basic so most immobilisers can be overcome with a length of wire to the coil and a spanner across the solenoid.
50/0951 1968 Wedgewood blue +2, 1990 Mini Cooper RSP
User avatar
Jason1
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1589
Joined: 03 Nov 2005
Location: Colchester, Essex. UK

PostPost by: pereirac » Tue Jul 10, 2012 12:39 pm

I always disconnect the battery if I leave the car for any period of time, it makes the car more difficult to steal (hopefully) and reduces the chance of any bonfires! Having seen a fiberglass car melt in a fire, it's not a pretty sight. Don't mind losing the radio settings, it not as if I can usually hear it anyway.
Carl

72 Elan Sprint
87 Excel SE
97 Alpina B10

http://www.lotuselan.co.uk
User avatar
pereirac
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Location: Cambridgeshire

PostPost by: worzel » Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:46 pm

Hi Mark

Only personal experience- I had an Excel for 11 years and I fitted it with a Laserline Cat 1 spec. Never gave any trouble- no false alarms etc. Not cheap since the insurers would only accept installation by a qualified person who certificated it. On the elan I have a Foxguard. Not sure if still made as by now it's getting on a bit- again can't fault it. Ear splitting decibel level. I think in general these aftermarket alarms have pretty well had all of the wrinkles ironed out now- but they're not cheap.

If you want to be really awkward with car thieves think about fitting an inline hydraulic brake lock- the dragster /rallye boys use them. Most seem lever operated but I think some use keys. To activate you simply set it, at first brake application a floating valve locks the fluid line using back pressure. Would cause panic in a thief since the only option would be to flee the car since there's no apparent reason for the brake pedal to go rock hard. Police would problbly be on the scene pretty quickly as an immobile car would be likely to cause a bit of disruption!

There used to be a commercially available device but this is no longer made because all modern cars seem to use abs and this prevents the line lock working.

Regards

John
worzel
Fourth Gear
Fourth Gear
 
Posts: 696
Joined: 13 Jan 2004

PostPost by: prezoom » Tue Jul 10, 2012 3:38 pm

Just received my latest copy of Hot Rod magazine. There is an article on a device that can be installed on a car or bike that provides a trackable signal to locate the car if moved. The device has a sleep mode that reduces current draw to milliamps when the vehicle is parked, only to wake up when the car is moved. Not cheap at $500US and $100US per year after the first year. But you can track your car on your computer to find its location if moved by the wrong people.

Rob Walker
26-4889
Rob Walker
26-4889
50-0315N
1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

Owning a Lotus will get you off the couch
prezoom
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1248
Joined: 16 Mar 2009
Location: Escondido, California

PostPost by: pereirac » Sat Jul 14, 2012 11:33 am

For about $20 you can buy personal GPS jammers, so I do wonder hows effective a tracker is for a 'professional' thief?

Carl
Carl

72 Elan Sprint
87 Excel SE
97 Alpina B10

http://www.lotuselan.co.uk
User avatar
pereirac
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Location: Cambridgeshire

PostPost by: Jason1 » Sat Jul 14, 2012 4:53 pm

For about $20 you can buy personal GPS jammers, so I do wonder hows effective a tracker is for a 'professional' thief?


Very true. You can buy these in the UK but the thief needs to know that a tracker is fitted. If a car is stolen to order by a pro I doubt you would ever see it again.

For less than ?100 I would say it was worth a go.

Jason
50/0951 1968 Wedgewood blue +2, 1990 Mini Cooper RSP
User avatar
Jason1
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1589
Joined: 03 Nov 2005
Location: Colchester, Essex. UK

Total Online:

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests