Lotus Elan

Any Interest in Wilwood Front Brake Caliper Brackets?

PostPost by: steveww » Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:28 pm

Wilwood have obviously upset you in the past. The Midilite caliper is a
road caliper with full dust seals. As for flexing; I have not experiance
of this but I have seen Wilwood calipers on many race cars.

BTW I am also looking at HiSpec Motorsport M16 as well.

Roger Sieling wrote:
I fully agree with Martin's evaluation. Before you buy the Willwood
calipers, watch someone bleed them or just look at the calipers under
pressure. They flex SO VERY MUCH! I also agree with the other comment
that you will have an unbalanced system, with most of your braking will
be on the front, that is until the front calipers start to seize up.
Remember that these calipers are sold as "racing" brakes and have no
dirt seals, only hydraulic seals. Willwood caliper pistons used to also
be very weak and I suspected them of flexing too. The pistons used to be
pressed steel, rather than machined from billet. Very thin!

Roger

>>>***@***.*** 3/12/2006 4:30 AM >>>
On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 06:32:01 +0200, Arno Church wrote:

>Both Wilwood and Hispec are made in the US of A and they both make M16
/P16
>bolt on callipers

The American's can take the blame for the Wilwood's but the Hispec's
are unfortunately British made.

After seeing their performance "under pressure" - (More cheese,
Gromit?) I would only ever recommend AP or Alcon calipers which are
engineered and manufactured on a different plane altogether.


--

Regards,

Steve Waterworth
***@***.***

Einstein: "The faster you drive, the slower you age..."
User avatar
steveww
Coveted Fifth Gear
Coveted Fifth Gear
 
Posts: 1838
Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Location: Northamptonshire, England

PostPost by: "Roger Sieling" » Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:05 pm

Steve,

I've already said more than I should. My experience w/ these calipers
was primarily on a Nissan GT5 car competing in SCCA at the national
level. I was horrified at how much the calipers flexed while I was at
the caliper end of a bleeding operation. Admittedly, this was at least 5
years ago, and since then, my friend has finally given up trying for the
national championship, after being on the lower rungs of the podium for
many years. We always had problems getting the pads to wear evenly,
because of unequal pressures on the back of the pads. Calipers had to be
rebuilt every other race, because of scuffing on the pistons and dirt in
the annular clearance on the atmospheric side of the seals.

The pistons were nothing more than deeper cup type freeze plugs and I
had another person on this list machine us a set of SS pistons from
billet, which helped a lot. But when the day is done, I think the reason
you see them on lots of race cars is that they are cheap. They are easy
to buy, lots of shops sell them where there are few outlets for AP,Alcon
and Bremba. Yeah, brakes only slow you down, but when they hang up,
don't release fully which adds drag to the car when you don't want it,
and don't exert as strong and smooth a braking action when you want it,
I blame these components for part of the reason we never climbed to the
top rung. Joe Huffaker could always outbrake us.

You've never really said what you were doing w/ this car. If you are
autocrossing or just fast street driving, I can't imagine you'll ever
feel the change in unsprung weight. If you are seriously racing the car,
then you'd be "improving" the rear too. I am using Girling's old alloy
calipers on both my Lotus vintage racers and there are times I wonder if
both aren't overbraked, because they are such light cars.

My actual advice would be to go back to the original calipers, which
would be lighter than the +2 calipers that I believe you said you were
using, and buy some soft carbon/kevlar pads for them. I use "power pad"
brand on my racers, but others will also be good. If you have a choice,
use the softer compounds, since the harder ones will glaze over because
the car is so light.

Roger

>> ***@***.*** 3/22/2006 4:28 PM >>>
Wilwood have obviously upset you in the past. The Midilite caliper is a


road caliper with full dust seals. As for flexing; I have not
experiance
of this but I have seen Wilwood calipers on many race cars.

BTW I am also looking at HiSpec Motorsport M16 as well.

Roger Sieling wrote:
I fully agree with Martin's evaluation. Before you buy the Willwood
calipers, watch someone bleed them or just look at the calipers
under

pressure. They flex SO VERY MUCH! I also agree with the other
comment

that you will have an unbalanced system, with most of your braking
will

be on the front, that is until the front calipers start to seize up.
Remember that these calipers are sold as "racing" brakes and have no
dirt seals, only hydraulic seals. Willwood caliper pistons used to
also

be very weak and I suspected them of flexing too. The pistons used to
be

pressed steel, rather than machined from billet. Very thin!

Roger

>>>***@***.*** 3/12/2006 4:30 AM >>>
On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 06:32:01 +0200, Arno Church wrote:

>Both Wilwood and Hispec are made in the US of A and they both make
M16

/P16
>bolt on callipers

The American's can take the blame for the Wilwood's but the Hispec's
are unfortunately British made.

After seeing their performance "under pressure" - (More cheese,
Gromit?) I would only ever recommend AP or Alcon calipers which are
engineered and manufactured on a different plane altogether.


--

Regards,

Steve Waterworth
***@***.***

Einstein: "The faster you drive, the slower you age..."







YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

Visit your group "lotuselan" on the web.
To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
***@***.***
Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.






**********************************************************************
This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they
are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify
the system manager.
This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept by
MIMEsweeper for the presence of computer viruses.
www.mimesweeper.com
**********************************************************************
"Roger Sieling"
 

Total Online:

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests